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This one didn’t last a year…Is there something we should know ?
The Chief Executive of Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has been appointed to a similar role in Gold Coast, Australia.
Ron Calvert, who joined Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals in September 2011, has accepted the post of Chief Executive atGold Coast Hospital and Health Service which is set to run a new AU
Chris Scholey, Chairman of Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “I am naturally very disappointed that Ron has decided to leave and, on behalf of all the Board, would like to thank him for his contribution since joining us last September.

Chief Executive appointed to new role in Australia

Stafford hospital failings: is the NHS any safer now?

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As the public inquiry into the catalogue of failings at Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust comes to an end, some are asking whether the same thing could happen again elsewhere in the NHS.

One senior NHS manager has voiced concerns that many of the ingredients which contributed to the problems at Stafford hospital are emerging once again.

But regulators say the NHS is a now a very different organisation, in a much better position to respond to failings.

Hundreds more people died at Stafford Hospital than would have been expected between 2005 and 2008.

A series of catastrophic failings at the hospital were revealed in a Healthcare Commission report.

Managers were found to have been distracted by targets and cost-cutting, and regulators were accused of failing to pick up problems quickly enough, despite warnings from staff and patients.

The public inquiry began its hearings over a year ago. Its chair, Robert Francis QC, now has evidence from 181 witnesses, and more than a million pages of evidence to consider. He’s expected to publish his recommendations next year.

Never again

Julie Bailey, whose 86-year-old mother Bella died at Stafford Hospital, and who founded the organisation, Cure the NHS, has been to every day but one of the inquiry.

She says the NHS must observe its findings.

Continue reading the main story

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It’s inevitable that another Mid Staffordshire will be somewhere in the mix”

Anthony Sumara
Former chief exec
“We are a very determined group and we will never let another Mid Staffordshire happen,” she told me. “These recommendations must not be ignored.”

But the Francis Inquiry is taking place at the same time as the Health and Social Care Bill ushers in the biggest reorganisation the NHS has ever seen, and others worry that they will come too late.

The charity Action against Medical Accidents, or AVMA, says the bill will become law before it can incorporate the findings. Its Chief Executive, Peter Walsh, says they need to be embedded in NHS reform.

Worrying period

“I think it’s going to take the NHS some time to absorb these findings and achieve a safe NHS,” he said.

“We’re in a worrying transitional period, where people might take their eye off the ball and fail to protect patients.”

The man who was temporarily brought into Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust as a troubleshooting chief executive after the 2009 report goes further than that.

Anthony Sumara believes many of the ingredients that enabled Stafford Hospital’s problems to become so bad are re-emerging in the health service now.

“There are organisations going through management churn, which are not big enough to sustain themselves clinically, and are not being given the help they need,” he said.

“It’s inevitable that another Mid Staffordshire will be somewhere in the mix.”

That, of course, is every manager’s worst nightmare. But the failings at Mid Staffordshire reverberated around the NHS, and it has changed significantly as a result.

The Healthcare Commission has been replaced by the Care Quality Commission, which carries out more unannounced inspections, and has a more rigorous assessment process. There is also greater protection for whistle blowers.

NHS a safer place

And though the Care Quality Commission itself has been criticised for not doing its job properly, England’s NHS Medical Director, Bruce Keogh, is cautiously confident.

“No healthcare system is utterly safe, but our NHS is a much safer place than it was three years ago,” he said.

The biggest difference, he argues, is that the NHS now pays far more attention to the way patients are looked after. He insists staff should treat anyone in hospital as they would a visitor to their home.

“We’ve put quality right at the heart of the NHS,” he said.

“All NHS trusts are expected to focus on each and every service they provide in terms of effectiveness, safety and patient experience.”

But Julie Bailey, still mourning the death of her mother, is not reassured. She says she still hears of cases of dreadful NHS care, and says when the public inquiry’s findings are published, they should usher in a new era of safer patient care.

“We owe it to our loved ones,” she said, “we owe it to this community – members of whom have lost their lives under dreadful circumstances.”

Those circumstances, everyone agrees, should never be repeated. But the question is just how much the NHS has changed already, and whether the findings of the public inquiry will help prevent another catastrophe like the one at Stafford Hospital.

Tonight: Has the NHS Stopped Caring? – ITV News

Tonight: Has the NHS Stopped Caring? – ITV News.

Tonight: Has the NHS Stopped Caring?
- last updated Thu 21 Mar 2013
Health Tonight

The Care Quality Commission has said that 1 in 5 hospitals do not offer elderly patients the dignity or respect they deserve Photo: ITV / Tonight
The NHS was once the envy of the world – but is it still?

Last month, Robert Francis delivered a damning report on the Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust, where several hundred patient deaths were caused by poor standards of care.

Since then, 14 NHS trusts have been placed under investigation over high mortality rates.

And this week the Care Quality Commission reported that elderly patients were not being treated with the dignity or respect they deserve in nearly a fifth of NHS hospitals inspected over the last year.

Campaigners have been calling on NHS Chief Sir David Nicholson to resign in the aftermath of failures in care Credit: ITV / Tonight
For retired Sales Director Peter Bridle it comes as no surprise. His mother Patricia, a former nurse, died aged 86 at the Alexandra Hospital, in Redditch.

He is scathing about the care she received at the hospital and has received a personal apology from the Chief Executive who says that “significant changes” have now been made there to ensure best possible care, respect and dignity for patients.

Patricia’s was one of 35 cases of patient neglect at the Alexandra Hospital between 2002 and 2011.

But it is not only patients and their families who are worried about the care and compassion being administered in hospitals.

Nurse Helene Donnelly worked at Stafford Hospital for six years. She tells of her shame at the behaviour of some nurse colleagues and how she would sometimes return home in tears at the way patients were being treated.

But she felt her concerns about standards of care at the hospital – now under new management – were wilfully ignored by hospital managers at the time.

Dr Peter Carter, at the Royal College of Nursing, believes that medical advancements and an ageing population have placed increasing demands upon the profession.

He fears that some nurses are left “burnt-out” by the demands of the job.

And Julie Bailey of Cure the NHS tells reporter Fiona Foster that a change of culture goes hand in hand with a change of leadership.

She has demanded the resignation of NHS boss Sir David Nicholson, though he is on record as saying he is the best man to usher in a new era in which patient care is at the heart of the system. And he has been backed by the Prime Minister and the Health Secretary.

The programme goes to Hillingdon Hospital in Uxbridge where it speaks to nurses who are in training for a hospital career.

A trainee nurse offers the sort of care we expect and hope for in NHS hospitals Credit: ITV / Tonight
Senior Charge Nurse Mark Troup, who is responsible for training, says he gets extremely angry when critics allege that compassion has gone out of the profession.

When you’re looking after families of bereaved relatives and you see student nurses and junior staff nurses holding the hands of people who have just lost their loved ones, you can’t say that compassion has died in our profession.”

– MARK TROUP, SENIOR CHARGE NURSE
The body responsible for protecting standards of care in the NHS is the Care Quality Commission.

I think people want to know when they use a hospital is it safe? Will it look after me and will it make me better? What we know is that the leadership and culture of organisations is absolutely critical to how those questions are going to be answered. I don’t think we’ve looked at those questions hard enough in the past and we’ll change the way we inspect to make sure we focus on those.”

– DAVID BEHAN, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
The Government says it’s planning to strengthen laws protecting whistleblowers from any form of bullying and promises to outlaw gagging clauses where they relate to patient care.

Letter to Patients Liason 15 August 2011

Dear Sharon,
I would like to thank you and your staff for the letter of reply that you sent. My father in law has spent some time in Ward 14 and then Ward 25 and both myself and my wife feel that the care and attention given to him has been outstanding and there is a noticeable improvement in the hospital since my time there last year.

I also must add that the positive way that you have approached my comments and the action plan that has been compiled are first rate. Perhaps a little late for me but will be of benefit to patients in years to come.

This leaves one outstanding point that has been giving me trouble for the last year since my stroke. I need an answer to get my peace of mind and I need to be able to accept what has happened to me . That is: Having read all the documents a few points are apparent. I was seen by Dr Chadha and his stroke team at lunchtime on Friday and he concluded that I was starting a new stroke on the other side of my brain and should be moved onto the Acute stroke Unit for treatment.
Some 6 hours later when I arrived on the Acute stroke Unit the staff nurse was correct when she told my wife that she had no idea as to my condition as she did not have my notes, how could she have known my condition?
When I asked for medical assistance a little time later, when the stroke was really taking grip, I was told by the same nurse that all the doctors had gone home. Why should she lie? When I asked again for assistance the second time, she knew that there was none available and told me so. It must have been hard on her as she would have spent many years training to become fully qualified to do her job on this specialist ward just to be abandoned by the system.
I understand how she must have felt, unable to give any assistance to a person, that had been dumped on one of her beds, at the start of the weekend with no form of information available. When it was time to finish her shift she went home and gave me not another thought, after all, this is what all the other medical staff had done and why shouldn’t she?

On the Monday morning I was seen by a doctor at 5 30 Am when the medical staff returned from their weekend off and then by Dr Chadha when he did his rounds later that morning. He did manage to realise I had indeed had a new stroke as the whole or right hand side was paralysed. After all he is a specialist in this field and he can tell these things. I believed that having seen the government campaign, FAST, that time is of an essence when dealing with stroke victims.
There is a risk of a bleed on the brain that is detectable with a scan and according to my doctor; clot busting agents can be administered to aid recovery. It is also advantageous to monitor the victim as a stroke can be lethal complaint. However his would necessitate staff being aware of the patient’s condition and suitably qualified staff being on the premises. I always have considered that illness was a 24/7 sort of thing but to your hospital it is strictly a 9-5 Monday to Friday business with weekends off.

This is the only life I have, there are no re-runs, no second chances, and what has happened to me will last me for the rest of my life. I appreciate that I am only an annoying statistic and statistically well within acceptable limits but something has cataclysmically gone wrong.

It is just that I fell horribly let down by your hospital system that is considered to be ‘the best in the world’. Had I been laid in a ditch somewhere, I would have received the same level of medical excellence…..None. At least I would have understood why I was there and why I was totally alone and unaided.

Having this stroke meant to me that one day I was doing well with a full life in front of me and the next I not even half a man. Every day is a struggle. Believe me… And I need an answer.

I WISH

I WISH that I had not gone to the Doctors when I was not feeling very well.

I WISH that when My Doctor said that I might have had a small stroke, I had not gone to the Hospital at Doncaster.

I WISH I had stayed at home with my wife and my family, in my own familiar house. Nice and secure and cared for.

I WISH I had waited until the time that my right eye failed, my right palm and the sole of my right foot went numb.

And then gone to A&E.

I WISH I hadn’t gone to Doncaster Royal Infirmary and I WISH that I had gone to any other hospital.

Because then, I would have been treated within the critical first 3 Hrs. and would have received the treatment that I needed.

WOULD IT HAVE BEEN TOO MUCH TO EXPECT??

I needed to try and work out  the time I spent at Doncaster Royal Infirmary. There were so many questions that I needed answers for

There is an outstanding point that has been giving me trouble  since my stroke and I need an answer to get my peace of mind and I need to be able to accept what has happened to me . That is: Having read all the documents a few points are apparent. I was seen by Dr Chadha and his stroke team at lunchtime on Friday because I had suddenly lost the use of my right eye, my right palm was numb as had the sole of my right foot and he observed that I was starting a new stroke on the other side of my brain and should be moved onto the Acute stroke Unit for treatment straight away.

Some 6 hours later when I arrived on the Acute stroke Unit

This is the only life I have, there are no re-runs, no second chances, and what has happened to me will last me for the rest of my life. I appreciate that I am only an annoying statistic and statistically well within acceptable limits but something has cataclysmically gone wrong.

It is just that I fell horribly let down by your hospital system that is considered to be ‘the best in the world’. Had I been laid in a ditch somewhere, I would have received the same level of medical excellence…..None. At least I would have understood why I was there and why I was totally alone and unaided.

Having this stroke meant to me that one day I was doing well with a full life in front of me and the next I not even half a man. Every day is a struggle. Believe me… And I need an answer.

What a terrible thing, the staff at Tickhill brought a ray of hope into my life every day and saved my sanity…NOT LIKE THOSE MONSTERS AT DONCASTER ROYAL INFIRMARY

Montagu Hospital in Mexborough has become the key centre for the rehabilitation of people recovering from serious illness or injury in Doncaster and the Dearne Valley yesterday (30 August), following the transfer of the final few patients from Tickhill Road Hospital.

Montagu Hospital takes on lead rehabilitation role, as last patients leave Tickhill Road.